Robert A. Sershon, MD

Anterior Total Hip Replacement, Robotic Knee Replacement, and Revision Joint Replacement

Dr. Robert Sershon is a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in anterior total hip replacement, robotic knee replacement, and outpatient joint replacement. His expertise allows him to serve as referral source for complex and revision joint replacements.

A pioneer of the robotic surgery program at Anderson Clinic, Dr. Sershon and his team are dedicated to developing and investigating operative techniques with potential to enhance recovery and improve patient outcomes. An NCAA swimming national champion (turned running enthusiast), Dr. Sershon understands the importance of providing patients the ability to return to the activities they love in a safe and timely fashion.

Dr. Sershon is a dedicated researcher. He has received national recognition and multiple honors for his work in joint replacement, including awards and support from the prestigious Knee Society and Hip Society. An active member in several local and national organizations, he has been invited to present his research across the country and has published over 75 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, and abstracts. 

A Chicago native, Dr. Sershon grew fond of the Mid-Atlantic during his tenure at Johns Hopkins University. Following completion of his undergraduate degree with honors, Dr. Sershon returned to Chicago for nine years to complete his medical education and orthopedic surgery residency training at the world-renowned Rush University Medical Center. Dr. Sershon then completed his fellowship in knee and hip replacement surgery at the Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute, at which time he was invited to join the practice.

In his free time, Dr. Sershon enjoys running, spending time outdoors with his family, and refurbishing furniture. He is happily married (Jenny) with two sons (Axel and Jack) and a dog (Beans).

"Everything my team does centers on improving our patients’ lives. Whether it is individualizing patient care, innovating surgical techniques, or performing influential research, our team is committed to making our patients better in everything we do."

Dr. Sershon's Reviews:

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Patient Forms

New Patient Medical History

Hip Survey

Knee Survey

Medications For Surgery

Anterior Hip Replacement Recovery: 4 week visit

Knee Replacement Recovery: 4 week visit

Hospital Affiliations

Inova Mount Vernon Hospital

Harbor Heights Surgery Center

Inova Fairfax Hospital

FAQ’s: Joint Replacement Surgery


Disclaimer: These questions and answers are specifically for Dr. Sershon’s patients at The Anderson Orthopaedic Clinic. Different surgeons may have differing opinions.

Prior To Your Joint Replacement
What Is A Hip Replacement?
Total hip replacements are performed with the goals of reducing pain, improving function, and enhancing quality of life. Hundreds of thousands of patients undergo hip replacements annually in the United States to treated hip conditions caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, congenital deformities, fractures, trauma, and other hip-related problems.
The surgery involves replacing the damaged surfaces of the hip, which is a ball-and-socket joint. The head and neck of the femur (thigh bone) are removed and replaced with a ceramic ball and titanium stem. The damaged hip socket is then lined with a titanium "cup" into which a plastic liner is inserted. The junction of the ceramic ball and plastic liner creates a new, movable hip joint.

What Is An Anterior Total Hip Replacement?
Dr. Sershon performs the muscle-sparing anterior approach for total hip replacement. Doing so enables him to perform a hip replacement without cutting the muscles surrounding the hip or traumatically dislocating the joint. Patients are typically walking 1-2 hours after surgery and go home the same day or next day. The goal of the procedure is to provide a stable, functional, and pain-free hip with minimal trauma during surgery.

What Is A Total Knee Replacement?
Total knee replacements are performed with the goals of reducing pain, improving function, and enhancing quality of life. Hundreds of thousands of patients undergo knee replacements annually in the United States to treated hip conditions caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, traumatic arthritis, osteonecrosis, and other knee conditions.
The surgery involves “resurfacing” the lower part of the thigh bone (femur), upper part of the shin bone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). Less than one centimeter of bone is removed from each of these surfaces, which are then capped (resurfaced) by metal and plastic components. The junction of the metal and plastic creates a new, moveable knee joint.

What Is A Partial Knee Replacement?
Partial knee replacements differ from total knee replacements in that they only replace one of the three compartments of the knee joint. Proponents of partial knee replacements believe the less invasive procedure results in a more functional knee, less invasive surgery, and quicker recovery when compared to total knee replacements. Candidates for partial knee replacements have arthritis affecting only one compartment of the joint, with sparing of the two remaining compartments. Similar to total knee replacements, partial knee replacements are performed with the goals of reducing pain, improving function, and enhancing quality of life.
The surgery involves “resurfacing” the medial (inner) or lateral (outer) part of the lower thigh bone (femur) and upper part of the shin bone (tibia). Less than one centimeter of bone is removed from each of these surfaces, which are then capped (resurfaced) with metal and plastic components. The junction of the metal and plastic creates a new, moveable knee joint.

What Is Robotic Knee Replacement?
Using robotic assistance, Dr. Sershon is able to create a customized 3D plan for surgery that accurately and consistently restores each patient's unique anatomy, alignment, balance. The goal of robotic surgery is to enhance early recovery while improving the replacement's function and longevity. Patients are typically walking 1-2 hours after surgery and go home the same day or next day. The goal of the procedure is to provide a stable, functional, and pain-free knee with minimal trauma during surgery.

How Do I Know When It Is Time For A Hip or Knee Replacement?
Patients with painful, degenerative hips and knees often present with decreased function, continued pain, and diminished quality of life due to their joints. These individuals have often attempted and failed nonoperative treatment including weight loss, anti-inflammatory medication, acetaminophen, therapy, injections, and/or activity modification. The final decision rests with the patient and is based on the pain and disability from the joint influencing their quality of life.

What Is Outpatient Joint Replacement? Am I A Candidate?

Dr. Sershon performs outpatient hip and knee replacement surgery in both surgery center and hospital settings. Patients arrive for surgery 1-2 hours prior to their replacement and typically spend 6 hours in total at the facility. Candidates are healthy individuals with a strong social support system. Investigations performed by Dr. Sershon and his colleagues at The Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute have shown outpatient joint replacement to be safe and effective with high patient satisfaction.

How Long Does It Take To Recover From A Hip Replacement?
Everybody recovers at their own pace. As a general rule, most patients are walking with significantly improved pain by 2-4 weeks after a hip replacement. Maximum benefit is often achieved by 6 months; however, continued improvement in strength, endurance, range of motion, and function can be expected up to twelve months following surgery.

How Long Does It Take To Recover From A Knee Replacement?
Everybody recovers at their own pace. As a general rule, most patients are walking with significantly improved pain by 4-6 weeks after a knee replacement. Continued improvement in strength, endurance, range of motion, and function are expected up occur to twelve months following surgery.

How Long Will My Joint Replacement Last?
The Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute data suggests over 90% of hip replacements will be well-functioning 20 years after surgery. Global registry data suggests over 80% of knee replacements can expect to be well-functioning 20 years after surgery. Current data suggests hip and knee replacements have an annual failure rate between 0.5-1.0%

Is There Such A Thing As Being Too Young For A Joint Replacement?
No, there is no such thing as being “too young” to undergo of a joint replacement. In fact, literature suggests that patients younger than 50 years old are highly satisfied with their joint replacement. Certain conditions, such as hip dysplasia or hip impingement, predispose patient to early joint degeneration and end-stage arthritis. When this occurs and nonoperative treatment has failed, a joint replacement is a perfectly reasonable solution.

What Is My Hip Replacement Made Of?
Hip replacements most commonly consist of titanium, plastic and ceramic without the use of cement. Certain replacements have an additional hydroxyapatite coating that is believe to enhance cementless implant fixation to the bone. Nearly all elective joint replacements in our practice are performed without the use of cement.

What Is My Knee Replacement Made Of?
Knee replacements most commonly consistent of cobalt-chrome, and plastic. Knee replacements can be performed with or without the use of cement; the use of which is typically based on the surgeon’s preference and comfort.

What Are The Risk Of Joint Replacements?
Major complications are rare following hip and knee replacement surgery, occurring in 1-5% of patients. The most common surgical complications include infection, implant failure, bleeding, blood clots, fracture, nerve injury, leg length differences, continued pain, and stiffness. Medical complications such as heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and gastrointestinal bleeding are also rare but can occur. Each patient will have a unique risk profile based on their medical history. Dr. Sershon makes efforts to help patients optimize their health prior to surgery in order to diminish the chance of complications occurring.

How Long Will I Have To Take Off Work?
This heavily depends on the physical nature of your job. Individuals with sedentary jobs can return as early as 2 weeks following surgery if their pain is controlled, the feel they are progressing appropriately, and they no longer require narcotic medication. Those with labor-intensive jobs often plan on taking 6-12 weeks off of work prior to returning.

How Much Therapy Will I Need Following My Hip Replacement?
The Anderson Orthopaedic Institute has formulated a home therapy program for hip replacement patients that is safe, effective, and convenient. Because of the success we have had with this program, over 90% of our patients do not require formal physical therapy following their hip replacement.

How Much Therapy Will I Need Following My Knee Replacement?
Patients undergoing a knee replacement often attend formal physical therapy for 6-8 weeks following surgery. Unlike hip replacements, knee replacements more often require attention from a certified physical therapist to assist them in regaining range of motion, strength, and function.

Preparing for Your Joint Replacement
What Exercises Should I Do Prior To My Joint Replacement?
Walking and low impact exercises (biking, swimming, elliptical) that elevate the heart rate while improving muscle endurance are the best exercises to perform prior to a joint replacements. Formal physical therapy prior to surgery (“prehab”) is not required for most patients. Bottom line: any exercise that does not cause significant pain is a good exercise.

What Can I Do To Improve My Health Prior To My Joint Replacement?
Maintaining a healthy weight and well-balanced diet will improve your outcome following surgery. If you are already healthy, keep it up! If you have active or chronic medical issues, you should work with your primary care provider or health coach to optimize your health prior to surgery. Common health problems with room for improvement include obesity, malnutrition, diabetes, anemia, heart failure, kidney disease, and smoking.

What Should I Eat While Preparing For My Replacement?
A well-balanced diet is important leading up to surgery. Increasing protein intake is encouraged, as higher protein levels improve healing and recovery following surgery.
Avoid processed foods, soda, and other foods/drinks with added sugar. Having stable/controlled blood sugars will decrease your risk of complications following surgery.

How Should I Prepare My Home For My Upcoming Joint Replacement?
- Prepare a comfortable area with your normal essentials nearby.
- Pick up throw rugs and anything on the floor that you believe may trip you.
- Move long phone and electrical cords out of the way.
- Place non-skid surfaces in place in tubs and showers.
- Use footwear with non-skid soles.
- Install a handrail in your staircase if you must use the stairs and do not have one.
- Night-lights in the hallways and bathrooms.
- Flat, firm mattresses are preferred.
- Prepare meals ahead of time.
- Have fresh linens on your bed for when you return home.
- If you have pets, make sure you arrange for their care as well.
- Carry a phone with you to call for help in case of an emergency.
- Arrange transportation for groceries, follow-up visits, and other essentials.

What Equipment Will I Need Following My Joint Replacement?
- You will need cane, walker, and/or crutches depending on your comfort level with each. During the first few days, we encourage a walker or two-crutches for balance.
- Compressive ice wrap, ice machine, or bags of ice for knee replacements
- An elevated toilet seat is often convenient, but not mandatory.
- A reaching tool for picking items off the floor can be helpful.

After Joint Replacement Surgery
What Can I Expect Immediately After My Surgery?
The first week following joint replacement surgery is often the hardest time during your recovery. It is normal to experience pain, swelling, fatigue, and weakness. Recovering from a joint replacement is a marathon, not a sprint! During your first week, you should rest, frequently ice and elevate leg, walk every hour, take your medications as instructed, and use our Rally Recover app to guide you through the recovery process.

How Can I Decrease Pain and Swelling After Surgery?
It is normal have pain and swelling in your legs after surgery. Elevating, icing, taking your medications as instructed, walking every hour, and doing your exercises will help improve pain and swelling.

How Should I Take My Medications?
For detailed instructions, please refer to our Medications For Surgery link. Some patients may have received medications that differ from this list, which means that we discussed a specialized plan for you during your office visit.

How Often Should Ice Therapy Be Used?
For a minimum of 10 days, you should ice and elevate your operative extremity for 20 minutes every 1-2 hours you are awake. This will help decrease swelling and inflammation, which will speed your recovery and decrease your pain. You may continue doing this for as long as you find it to be helpful.

How Should I Apply Ice My Leg?
There are multiple ways to properly apply ice to your leg. Ice machines, cold-compression wraps, and standard ice wrapped in a cloth will all do the trick! Remember to never place ice directly onto your skin.

How Should I Elevate My Leg, And Does Elevating My Leg Help My Recovery?
Elevating your legs decreases swelling and inflammation through improving blood flow back to the heart. Proper elevation entails laying on your back with your legs elevated 1-2 feet in the air. If sitting in a recliner, make sure to place several pillows under your calf (not under your knee) to ensure your ankle is above the level of your heart.

Why Has My Pain Increased 2 weeks After Surgery?
“Over-doing it” is common! As you increase your activity level, it is common to have 1-2 days of increased pain and swelling. This is a normal part of recovery and will occur less often as time passes.

Why Do I Feel Clicking In My Joint Replacement?
Clicking sensations are common immediately following joint replacements. Fortunately, these sensations decrease over time.

What Should I Eat During My Joint Replacement Recovery?
A high protein, low sugar diet with plenty of vegetables is strongly encouraged. Cut out soda, juice, processed foods, and other high-sugar foods. Drink at least 8 glasses of water daily to stay hydrated, decrease nausea, and help your body heal. Protein supplementation drinks are fine to take, so long as they contain low sugar content.

Incision Care
When Should I Remove My Dressing?
You should remove your dressing 7-10 days after surgery. It should peel off like a band-aid. There is no need to cover the incision after this.

What Should My Incision Look Like?
Early on, your incision should be slightly raised and covered in surgical glue. Your sutures are under the skin and will dissolve over time. As this happens, your incision will flatten out, swelling will subside, and things will become more cosmetically pleasing.

Can I Get My Incision Wet?
Yes...to a certain extent. You may begin taking showers the day following surgery with your dressing in place, allowing the water to run down the leg. Once the dressing is taken off, you may allow the water to run down your operative leg, but please do not scrub the incision. Do not submerge the incision in water (bath, pool, ocean, etc.) until after your 4-week visit.

Can I Apply Anything On My Incision?
Do not apply anything to your incision until after your 4-week postoperative visit.

Activities
What activities can I do during the first month after a joint replacement?
Walking is the best exercise. You may walk as much as you can comfortably tolerate. Be careful not to “overdo it”. Activities such as riding a stationary bike, walking on a treadmill, and modified yoga (no range of motion extremes) are encouraged. Chipping and putting is permitted for golfers. Please refrain from higher-impact activities and activities that cause increased torque on your new replacement, such as running, tennis, squash, or racquetball.

When can I return to higher-impact activities after a joint replacement?
After your four-week postoperative visit, you will be allowed to partake in any activity you feel comfortable performing that does involve jumping or running. This includes hiking, bicycling outdoors, swimming, golf, tennis, squash, racquetball, or horseback riding. Activities that involve running are discouraged until 3 months postoperatively.

How Should I Navigate Stairs After A Joint Replacement?
The general rule with stairs: up with the good, down with the bad. When going up stairs, use a railing and lead with your non-operative leg. When going down stairs, use a railing and lead with your operative leg. Have somebody available to help you perform stairs until you are confidence and comfortable with performing them on your own.

For a visual demonstration, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKGrD46gd_k

When Can I Drive?
Literature suggests reaction time for driving returns approximately 2 weeks following a hip replacement and 4 weeks following a knee replacement. Patients must be off narcotic medication at this time and walking without an assistive device (cane/walker) prior to attempting driving.

When Can I Have Sex?
We recommend avoiding sex until at least 2 weeks following surgery. Patients with hip replacements should avoid extremes of flexion or extension of their hip during intercourse. Knee replacements should avoid kneeling on their incision. Being positioned on the bottom is preferable for the first month. The basic recommendation is to start slow and stop if you are experiencing pain or uncertainty.

What positions are safe for sleeping after surgery?
Sleeping can be difficult following a joint replacement. Patients undergoing an anterior hip replacement should avoid sleeping on the side of their surgery until their 4 week postoperative appointment. Sleeping on your back or on your non-operative side with a pillow between your legs are often the most comfortable positions.

Research

Anterior Total Hip Replacement

Outpatient Joint Replacement

Robotic Knee Replacement

Partial Knee Replacement

Revision Hip Replacement

Revision Knee Replacement

Publications

RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

Slaven SE, Cody JP, Sershon RA, Ho H, Hopper RH, Fricka KB. The Impact of Coronal Alignment on Revision in Medial Fixed-Bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2020;35(2):353-7.

Sershon RA, McDonald JF, Ho H, Goyal N, Hamilton WG. Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed at an Ambulatory Surgery Center versus Hospital Outpatient Setting: Complications, Revisions, and Readmissions. J Arthroplasty. 2019;34(12):2861-65.

Fillingham YA, Darrith B, Calkins TE, Abdel MP, Malkani AL, Schwarzkopf R, Padgett DP, Culvern C, Sershon RA, Bini S, Della Valle CJ, Hip Society Research Group. 2019 Mark Coventry Award – A Multicentre Randomized Clinical Trial of Tranexamic Acid in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: Does the Dosing Regimen Matter? Bone Joint J. 2019;101(7):10-16.

Sershon RA, Li J, Calkins TE, Courtney PM, Nam D, Gerlinger TL, Sporer SM, Levine BR. Prospective Validation of a Demographically-Based Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty Implant Size Calculator. J Arthroplasty. 2019;34(7):1369-73.

Sershon RA, Tecle N, Della Valle CJ, Berger RA, Levine BR, Nam D. The Impact of an Acute, Traumatic Wound Dehiscence on Clinical Outcomes Following Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2018;33(8):2613-15.

Nam D, Sershon RA, Levine BR, Della Valle CJ. The Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Orthopedic Surgery. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2018;26(9):295-302.

Bohl DD, Sershon RA, Saltzman BM, Darrith B, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Surgery for Geriatric Hip Fracture. J Arthroplasty. 2018;33(5):1552-56.

Sershon RA, Luchetti TJ, Cohen MS, Wysocki RW. Radial Head Replacement with a Bipolar System: A Minimum 7-Year Follow-up. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2018;27(2):e38-44.

Basques BA, Bell JA, Sershon RA, Della Valle CJ. The Influence of Patient Gender on Morbidity Following Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2018;33:345-49.

Sershon RA, Courtney PM, Sporer SM, Levine BR. Can Demographic Variables Accurately Predict Component Sizing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty? J Arthroplasty. 2017;32(10):3004-08.

Sershon RA, Tetreault MW, Della Valle CJ. A Prospective, Randomized Trial of Mini-incision Posterior and Two-incision Total Hip Arthroplasty: Minimum Five-Year Follow-up. J Arthroplasty. 2017;32:2462-65

Bohl DD, Saltzman BM, Sershon RA, Darrith B, Okroj KT, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2017;32(6):1991-95.

Sershon RA, Diaz A, Bohl DD, Levine BR. Effect of Body Mass Index on Digital Templating for Total Hip Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2017;32(3):1024-26.

Gross CE, Sershon RA, Frank JM, Easley ME, Holmes GB. Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Talus. JBJS Rev. 2016;4(7):e2.

Bohl DD, Sershon RA, Fillingham YA, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Sources of Sepsis Following Total Joint Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2016;31(12):2875-79.

Ahn J, Rossi VJ, Tabaraee E, Sershon RA, Singh K. Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation: MIS, Endoscopic, Percutaneous Techniques. Seminars in Spine Surgery. 2016;28(1):20-25.

Bohl DD, Ahn J, May BC, Massel DH, Tabaraee E, Sershon RA, Basques BA, Singh K. Does Greater Body Mass Index Increase the Risk for Recurrent Herniation Following a Single-Level Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy? Spine. 2016;41(9):816-21.

Sershon RA, Balkissoon R, Della Valle CJ. Current Indications for Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty in 2016. Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med. 2016;9(1):84-92.

Balkissoon R, Sershon RA, Paprosky WG, Della Valle CJ. Classifying Femoral Bone Deficiency: Picking the Right Tool for the Job. Seminars in Arthroplasty. 2015;26:156-162.

Sershon RA, Al-Shihabi LL, Colman MW. A 19-year-old Female Patient with Progressively Worsening Back Pain. Orthopedics Today. 2015;35(4):28-30.

Sershon RA, Van Thiel GS, Lin EC, McGill KC, Cole BJ, Verma NN, Romeo AA, Nicholson GP. Clinical Outcomes of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Under the Age of 60. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2014;23(3):395-400.

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, McGill KC, Bush-Joseph CA, Nicholson GP, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. Role of the Superior Labrum after Biceps Tenodesis in Glenohumeral Stability. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2014;23(4):485-91.

Sershon RA, Mather RC 3rd, Sherman SL, McGill KC, Romeo AA, Verma NN. Low Accuracy of Interpretation of Rotator Cuff MRI in Patients with Osteoarthritis. Acta Orthop. 2013;84(5):479-482.

Salata MJ, Lin EC, Sershon RA, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Evaluation of Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Do Anchors Really Matter? Am J of Sports Med. 2013 Feb;41(2):283-90.

Strauss EJ, Sershon RA, Barker JU, Kercher J, Salata MJ, Verma NN. The Basic Science and Clinical Applications of Osteochondral Allografts. Bull NYU Hosp Jt Dis. 2012;70(4):217-23.

BOOK CHAPTERS

Sershon RA, Fricka KB. Outpatient Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty. In Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Indications, Surgical Techniques, and Complications. Publication in process.

Sershon RA, Parks NL, Engh CA Jr. Osseous Deficiencies in Total Knee Arthroplasty. In The Adult Knee, 2nd Edition. Publication in process.

Sershon RA, Bell JA, Levine BR. Septic Hip Arthritis: Native and Arthroplasty. In Synopsis of Hip Surgery. Publication in process.

Culp BM, Sershon RA, Levine BR. Pearls in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: Addressing the Femoral Side - From Minimal to Severe Bone Loss. In Surgical Techniques and Infection Control in Hip & Knee Arthroplasty. Publication in process.

Chalmers PN, Sershon RA, Cole BJ. Meniscal Deficiency - Repair and Transplantation. In Biologic Knee Reconstruction: A Surgeon’s Guide. Elsevier, NY, NY, 2014.

CV Details

Scientific Presentations

Sershon RA, McDonald JF, Ho H, Hamilton WG. Periprosthetic Fracture Risk of Anterior versus Posterior Approach in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Comparative Cohort Analysis. AAOS Annual Meeting. Orlando, FL. March 2020. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Fillingham YA, Malkani AL, Abdel MP, Schwarzkopf R, Padgett DE, Vail TP, Culvern CN, Della Valle CJ. Independent Risk Factors for Transfusion in Contemporary Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty. AAOS Annual Meeting. Orlando, FL. March 2020. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Fillingham YA, Abdel MP, Malkani AL, Schwarzkopf R, Padgett PE, Vail TP, Nam D, Nahhas C, Culvern CN, Della Valle CJ, Hip Society Research Group. A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial of Tranexamic Acid in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: Does the Dosing Regimen Matter? AAOS Annual Meeting. Orlando, FL. March 2020. (Podium)

Slaven SE, Cody JP, Sershon RA, Ho H, Hopper RH, Fricka KB. Fixed-Bearing Medial Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty – Slight Varus, Just Right! AAOS Annual Meeting. Orlando, FL. March 2020. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Fillingham YA, Abdel MP, Malkani AL, Schwarzkopf R, Padgett PE, Vail TP, Nam D, Nahhas C, Culvern CN, Della Valle CJ, Hip Society Research Group. A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial of Tranexamic Acid in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: Does the Dosing Regimen Matter? AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2019. (Podium)

Slaven SE, Cody JP, Sershon RA, Ho H, Hopper RH, Fricka KB. Fixed-Bearing Medial Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty – Slight Varus, Just Right! AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2019. (Podium)

Sershon RA, McDonald JF, Ho H, Goyal N, Hamilton WG. Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed at an Ambulatory Surgery Center versus Hospital Outpatient Setting: Complications, Revisions, and Readmissions. AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2019. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Fillingham YA, Malkani AL, Abdel MP, Schwarzkopf R, Padgett DE, Vail TP, Culvern CN, Della Valle CJ. Independent Risk Factors for Transfusion in Contemporary Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty. AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2019. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Ho H, Hamilton WG. Periprosthetic Fracture Risk of Anterior versus Posterior Approach in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Comparative Cohort Analysis. AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2019. (Poster)

Sershon RA, McDonald JF, Ho H, Goyal N, Hamilton WG. Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed at an Ambulatory Surgery Center versus Hospital Outpatient Setting: Complications, Revisions, and Readmissions. EOA Annual Meeting, West Palm Beach, FL. October 2019. (Podium)

Li J, Sershon RA, Calkins TE, Courtney PM, Nam D, Gerlinger TL, Levine BR. Prospective Validation of a Demographically-Based Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty Size Calculator. MAOA Annual Meeting, Miramar Beach, FL. April 2019. (Podium)

Fillingham YA, Darrith B, Calkins TE, Abdel MP, Malkani AL, Schwartzkopf R, Padgett DE, Sershon RA, Bini SA, Della Valle CJ. A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial of Tranexamic Acid in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: Does the Dosage Regimen Matter? AAOS Annual Meeting. Las Vegas, NV. March 2018. (Podium)

Fillingham YA, Darrith B, Calkins TE, Abdel MP, Malkani AL, Schwartzkopf R, Padgett DE, Sershon RA, Bini SA, Della Valle CJ. A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial of Tranexamic Acid in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: Does the Dosage Regimen Matter? AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2018. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Tecle N, Della Valle CJ, Berger RA, Levine BR, Nam D. The Impact of an Acute, Traumatic Wound Dehiscence on Clinical Outcomes Following Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty. MAOA Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX. April 2018. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Tecle N, Della Valle CJ, Berger RA, Levine BR, Nam D. The Impact of an Acute, Traumatic Wound Dehiscence on Clinical Outcomes Following Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty. AAOS Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. March 2018. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Courtney PM, Brett D Rosenthal, Sporer SM, Levine BR. Can Demographic Variables Accurately Predict Component Sizing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty? AAOS Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. March 2018. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Luchetti Tj, Wysocki RW, Cohen MS. Radial Head Replacement with a Bipolar System: An Average 10-year Follow-up. ASSH Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA. Sept 2017. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Tetreault MW, Della Valle CJ. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Mini-incision Posterior Versus Two-incision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Follow-up Report at a Minimum of 5-Years. MAOA Annual Meeting, Amelia Island, FL. April 2017. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Hemu M, Wysocki RW, Cohen MS. Radial Head Replacement with a Bipolar System: An Average 10-year Follow-up. MAOA Annual Meeting. Amelia Island, FL. April 2017. (Podium)

Fillingham YA, Sershon RA, Darrith B, Bohl DD, Abdel MP, Della Valle CJ. Tranexamic Acid in Revision Total Joint Arthroplasty: What is the Optimal Dosing Regimen? MAOA Annual Meeting. Amelia Island, FL. April 2017. (Poster)

Bohl DD, Saltzman BM, Sershon RA, Okroj KT, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Surgery for Geriatric Hip Fracture. MAOA Annual Meeting. Amelia Island, FL. April 2017. (Poster)

Bohl DD, Sershon RA, Saltzman BM, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Total Joint Arthroplasty. MAOA Annual Meeting. Amelia Island, FL. April 2017. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Tetreault MW, Della Valle CJ. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Mini-incision Posterior Versus Two-incision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Follow-up Report at a Minimum of 5-Years. AAOS Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. March 2017. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Hemu M, Wysocki RW, Cohen MS. Radial Head Replacement with a Bipolar System: An Average 10-year Follow-up. AAOS Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. March 2017. (Podium)

Bohl DD, Saltzman BM, Sershon RA, Okroj KT, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Surgery for Geriatric Hip Fracture. AAOS Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. March 2017. (Podium)

Bohl DD, Sershon RA, Saltzman BM, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Total Joint Arthroplasty. AAOS Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. March 2017 (Podium)

Bohl DD, Sershon RA, Saltzman BM, Della Valle CJ. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Surgery for Geriatric Hip Fracture. AAHKS Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX. November 2016. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Erickson BJ, Cvetanovich GL, Frank RM, Provencher MT, Tilton A, Verma NN, Cole BJ, Bach BR. Principles of Diagnostic Arthroscopy. AAOS Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL. March 2016. (Scientific exhibit)

Bohl DD, Ahn J, Tabaraee E, Sershon RA, Basques BA, Singh K. Does Greater Body Mass Index Increase the Risk for Recurrent Herniation Following Lumbar Discectomy? AAOS Annual Meeting. Orlando, FL. March 2016. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Yanke AB, Shin JJ, Bach BR, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. Validation of the Glenoid Ratio Method for Measuring Glenoid Bone Loss: Controlled Cadaveric Experiment. AAOS Annual Meeting. Las Vegas, NV. March 2015. (Poster)

Riff AJ, Sershon RA, Chalmers PN, Bach BR. Biceps Tenodesis Update: Indications, Techniques, Results, and Complications. AAOS Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada. March 2015. (Scientific exhibit)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. ISAKOS Annual Meeting, Jaipur, India. November 2012. (Podium)

Van Thiel GS, Sershon RA, Lin EC, McGill KC, Cole MD BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. Clinical Outcomes of Subscapularis Repair. The ESSKA Annual Meeting, Geneva, Switzerland. May 2012. (Poster)

Van Thiel GS, Sershon RA, Lin EC, McGill KC, Cole MD BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. Clinical Outcomes of Subscapularis Repair. AANA Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL. May 2012. (Poster)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. ASES Biennial Meeting, Miami, FL. May 2012. (Podium)

Lin EC, Sershon RA, Van Thiel GS, McGill KC, Cole BJ, Verma NN, AARomeo, Nicholson GP. Clinical Outcomes of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Under the Age of 60. AAOS Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA. February 2012. (Poster)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. AOSSM Specialty Day, San Francisco, CA. February 2012. (Podium)

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role Of The Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis In Glenohumeral Kinematics And Stability. ASES Open Meeting, San Francisco, CA. February 2012. (Podium)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. ASES Open Meeting, San Francisco, CA. February 2012. (Podium)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Evaluation of Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Do Anchors Really Matter? ESSSE Annual Meeting, Lyon, France. September 2011. (Podium)

Lin EC, Sershon RA, Van Thiel GS, McGill KC, Cole BJ, Verma NN, AARomeo, Nicholson GP Clinical Outcomes of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Under the Age of 60. ESSSE Annual Meeting, Lyon, France. September 2011. (Poster)

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, McGill KC, Lin EC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role of the Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis in Glenohumeral Kinematics and Stability. ESSSE Annual Meeting, Lyon, France. September 2011. (Poster)

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, McGill KC, Lin EC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role Of The Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis In Glenohumeral Kinematics And Stability. AOA Annual Meeting, Boston, MA. June 2011. (Podium)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. AOA Annual Meeting, Boston, MA. June 2011. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Lin EC, Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, McGill KC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role Of The Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis In Glenohumeral Kinematics And Stability. The Rush Research Forum, Chicago, IL. May 2011. (Podium)

Sershon RA, Lin EC, Salata MJ, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. The Rush Research Forum, Chicago, IL. May 2011. (Poster)

Sershon RA, McGill KC, Strauss EJ, Verma NN, Romeo AA. Accuracy of Rotator Cuff Tear Diagnosis via MRI in Patients Undergoing Total Shoulder Arthroplasty. The Rush Research Forum, Chicago, IL. May 2011. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Lin EC, Van Thiel GS, McGill KC, Cole BJ, Verma NN, Romeo AA, Nicholson GP. Clinical Outcomes of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Under the Age of 60. The Rush Research Forum, Chicago, IL. May 2011. (Poster)

Sershon RA, Lin EC, McGill KC, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. Subscapularis Repair in Patients Under 50: A Retrospective Analysis. The Rush Research Forum, Chicago, IL. May 2011. (Poster)

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, McGill KC, Lin EC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role Of The Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis In Glenohumeral Kinematics And Stability. ISAKOS Annual Meeting, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. May 2011. (Podium)

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, McGill KC, Lin EC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role Of The Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis In Glenohumeral Kinematics And Stability. AANA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA. April 2011. (Podium)

McGill KC, Strauss EJ, Sershon RA, Verma NN, Romeo AA. Accuracy of Rotator Cuff Tear Diagnosis via MRI in Patients Undergoing Total Shoulder Arthroplasty. AANA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA. April 2011. (Poster)

Salata MJ, Sershon RA, Lin EC, Sherman SL, Gupta A, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA,Verma. NN. Biomechanical Characteristics of Different Transosseous Tunnel Repair Configurations for Rotator Cuff Repairs. AANA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA. April 2011. (Podium)

Strauss EJ, Salata MJ, Sershon RA, McGill KC, Lin EC, Garbis NG, Provencher MT, Wang VM, Cole BJ, Romeo AA, Verma NN. The Role Of The Superior Labrum Following Biceps Tenodesis In Glenohumeral Kinematics And Stability. AAOS Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. February 2011. (Podium)

Post a Review SpecialtyAnterior Hip Replacement
Hip Replacement
Knee Replacement
Robotic Knee Replacement
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Special Procedures & TechniquesAnterior Total Hip Replacement
Partial Knee Replacement
Robotic Total Knee Replacement
Robotic Joint Replacement
Outpatient Hip Replacement
Outpatient Knee Replacement
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